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Heading down the slippery slope of a skiing lawsuit

When you strap on a pair of skis or a snowboard and ride down a mountain, you are aware that some of what you are doing will carry some level of risk.  If you read the waiver that you’re required to sign before getting on a chairlift, you’ll know what you could be exposed to at any time during the day.

However, while you do give away some of your rights, several things may take place that are beyond your control which may result in an injury, or in some cases, death.  As skiing and snowboarding continue to become more popular as leisure time activities, it’s important for you to know what your rights are.

Many Portland skiers may head to nearby Oregon resorts such as Mt. Hood or Mt. Bachelor or make longer drives to resorts in Idaho or Washington.  Regardless of the destination, a skier may be an unwilling participant in an accident such as: colliding with other skiers or snowboarders; falling or running into stationary objects such as trees, fences, rocks, signs or barriers; a chairlift malfunction;  equipment failure;  or inadequate instruction from a resort instructor.

When these types of accidents take place, you may be able to seek compensation for your injuries in the form of payment for hospital bills, missing time from work, pain and suffering and other related financial impacts.

In the vast majority of cases, an attorney who specializes in ski accidents will be able to pursue damages on your behalf based on the negligence of others.  This may mean a skier or snowboarder was behaving recklessly on the mountain, dangerous terrain was not clearly marked or poorly maintained, chair lifts and rental equipment were poorly maintained, or an instructor did not give adequate instruction for your particular skill level.

If you’re injured in a ski or snowboard accident, it’s essential that you contact an attorney as soon as possible to protect your rights and explore your options.

Dawson Law Group serves Portland and surrounding Oregon communities.

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